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Douglass-Clark House

Douglass-Clark House
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This home, originally owned by Elmore Douglass, served as one of the earliest courthouses in Sumner County between 1788-1790. Attorney General Andrew Jackson even practiced at the home during his early law career on the western frontier. The home was later occupied by William and Emma (Douglass) Clark and their ten children. After the Civil War broke out in 1861, four of the Clark sons enlisted to fight on behalf of the Confederate cause. Of the four Clark brothers that enlisted, only one Clark boy returned home alive after the war’s end in 1865. Also enlisting to fight in the Civil War was Winchester Clark, a self-emancipated formerly enslaved man who had been previously been owned by the Clark family.

The Douglass-Clark House serves as an historic site as well as an interpretative center. The site is open Tuesdays-Saturdays between 9:00am-5:30pm for daily tours. Admission is free. The Douglass-Clark House is located on the trailhead for the Station Camp Creek Greenway, which is also free and open to the public.