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New Music Friday: Amythyst Kiah's Reimagined Version of "Black Myself"

Amythyst Kiah -- who Rolling Stone calls “one of Americana’s great up-and-coming secrets” -- releases a radically reimagined version of “Black Myself,” the GRAMMY-nominated song she originally recorded in 2019 with Our Native Daughters (the group…

Amythyst Kiah — who Rolling Stone calls “one of Americana’s great up-and-coming secrets” — releases a radically reimagined version of “Black Myself,” the GRAMMY-nominated song she originally recorded in 2019 with Our Native Daughters (the group includes Amythyst, Rhiannon Giddens, Leyla McCalla and Allison Russell).

 

Listen Here: https://found.ee/AKBlackMyself.

 

Produced by Tony Berg (Phoebe Bridgers, Amos Lee, Andrew Bird) and recorded at LA’s legendary Sound City Studios with Blake Mills (Fiona Apple, Alabama Shakes, Bob Dylan) and Wendy Melvoin (Prince & The Revolution, Madonna, Neil Finn), this new version departs from the mid-tempo and largely acoustic original version, amplifying the track’s kinetic tension via stacked vocals and a wash of electric guitar. In her collision of political commentary and personal revelation, Amythyst infuses “Black Myself” with a potent new urgency.

“‘Black Myself’ is the first song I’ve written that was confrontational,” says Amythyst.

“I’d always made it a point to sing songs that anybody could relate to, but this was something that had been welling up inside me for a long time. The reception of the song so far has given me hope that there are people out there who are ready to confront the shared trauma of racism, to look within ourselves and see how we might be perpetuating racist beliefs, and to do what is needed to create equality for all people.”

Born in Chattanooga and based in Johnson City, Amythyst Kiah’s commanding stage presence is matched by her raw and powerful vocals—a deeply moving, hypnotic sound that stirs echoes of a distant and restless past.

Accompanied interchangeably with banjo, acoustic guitar, or a full band, her eclectic influences span decades, finding inspiration in old time music, alternative rock, folk, country, and blues.

With an unforgettable voice that’s both unfettered and exquisitely controlled, Amythyst’s ability to cross boundaries is born from struggle. Growing up a Black and LGBTQ+ woman in the Bible Belt, she experienced severe social anxiety, grief, alienation – and ultimately, the hard-won triumph of total self-acceptance.